Hi.. I Am max!

We may still be few days into the third month of 2016, but for Apple it may seem like a long time. The tech giant and iPhone maker has seen some fairly good things happen to it, but so far, it seems the bad Stuffs have had a better bite of the Apple. While the company may have some internal squabbles unknown to the public — from the bad to the ugly, this are the most publicly outstanding setbacks for the company that we have parsed;

iPhone sales peak
Even before the year 2016 begun, industry analyst or ” prophets of doom ” as those who didn’t agree with them choose to call them, had predicted some bad stuffs for the tech giant. Perharps most controversial of them all is the prediction about a possible slum in iPhone sales in 2016. Morgan Stanley predicted that Apple is going to sell about 218 million iPhones in fiscal year 2016. This represents a 5.7 percent drop in comparison to the 2015 fiscal year that ended in September last year with an all time high iPhone sales of 231.2 million units. JPMorgan Chase & Co. also published a similar report late last year in the same direction. The bank’s analyst’s believe smartphone penetration and higher prices in international markets as possible reasons for the anticipated decline in iPhone sales.

error 53
In mid-may, the Error 53 security flaw was brought to the light. Apple had earlier claimed the “Error 53” was a security feature rather than a flaw. The error
message means your iPhone has permanently been disabled because the home button is broken or was repaired by a non-apple technician. The error remained dormant until iPhone users upgraded to the latest tweak of iOS 9 release. Instead of offering an Apology and perhaps making substantial attempt to solve the issue, Apple arrogantly wrote in a press release; “This security measure is necessary to protect your device and prevent a fraudulent Touch ID sensor from being used. If a customer encounters Error 53, we encourage them to contact Apple Support.” Aftr facing much backslash from its fans and industry observers, Apple changed it stand, apologized and fixed the controversial bug.

And then came the lawsuit filed against them by Immersion technologies. The company claimed that Apple’s “3D touch” and “force touch” features infringed on its patents for providing feedback when the screen of an electronic device is touched. Immersion technology also claimed that Apple Watch Taptic Engine, as well as the vibration patterns for ringtones and notifications also infringed on its patent, adding that multiple Apple devices used its intellectual property. Immersion subsequently filed a complaint with the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) seeking an exclusion order that prevents the sale of all Apple devices that infringed on its patent in the United States.

Samsung vs Apple
Similarly, last month, a US Court of Appeal reversed a May 2014 verdict from a federal court in San Jose, California, that ordered Samsung to pay $119.6 million for using Apple’s patented technology without permission. The court’s decision represented a major setback for Apple who has been waging almost a decade long war on the South Korean technology giant.

Perhaps most recently is the Supreme Court’s refusal to hear Apple inc’s appeal over an eBook price fixing judgement. The Supreme Court’s refusal reaffirmed an earlier Court of Appeal judgement that found Apple liable for engaging in a conspiracy that violated federal antitrust laws. The iPhone maker was asked to pay a $450 million fine — $400 million will go to ebook buyers who were forced to pay inflated prices and 50 million will go to the law firms that brought the class action.

Apple may be the most valued listed company in the world right, with a bank balance of over $200billion, but it does stop the tech giant from getting into lots of problems here and there. As we move towards mid 2016, the company can only pray for better luck.

(Visited 28 times, 1 visits, Share this post for more visits)

Related Post

Come On, Will You Go Without Sharing This?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *